Plane types: Boeing

Boeing 737

The Boeing 737 is one of the world's oldest aircraft models still being manufactured. Production of 737s began in the 60s, with its first flight coming in 1967 and its first commercial flight coming in 1968. It is currently the world's best selling aircraft ever. There are, on average, 1250 Boeing 737s airborne at any given moment. One lands or takes over roughly every 3 seconds and Boeing has received close to 10,000 orders for it since its inception, with over 8000 of those being delivered. It has a capacity of up to 215 passengers.  The airlines that primarily use the Boeing 737 include Southwest Airlines, Ryanair, United Airlines, and American Airlines.

Boeing 747

Also known as the Jumbo Jet and the Queen of the Skies, the Boeing 747 is one of the most recognizable aircrafts in the world. It is a wide-bodied commercial airliner as well as a cargo transport aircraft, and up until recently had held the record for having the largest passenger capacity for almost four decades. It is over twice the size of the Boeing 707 and features a double deck configuration for much of its length. The 747-400 is one of the fastest airliners currently in service, cruising at the high-subsonic speed of Mach 0.85 - 0.855.  The airlines that primarily use the Boeing 747 include United Airlines, Lufthansa, British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Korean Air, and China Airlines.

Boeing 757

The Boeing 757 is a mid-sized, narrow-bodied twin-engine jet airliner featuring a two-crew glass cockpit. Being the largest single-aisle passenger aircraft in the world, it has a capacity of up to 289 passengers and a range of 3,150 up to 3,900 nautical miles depending on the variant. It shares design features with the Boeing 767, which allows pilots to have the same type rating in order to operate both aircraft. The 757-200 is the most common variant still in operation all over the world. The airlines that primarily use the Boeing 757 include Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, and American Airlines.
 

 

Boeing 767

The Boeing 767 is a mid-sized, wide-bodied twin-engine jet airliner featuring a two-crew glass cockpit. It has a capacity of up to 375 passengers and a range of 3,850 up to 6,385 nautical miles depending on the variant. Although it is smaller than the Boeing 747, it is still wide enough such that it can feature a twin-aisle cabin as well as provide twin-aisle seating. It shares design features with the Boeing 757, which allows pilots to have the same type rating in order to operate both aircraft.  The airlines that primarily use the Boeing 767 include Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, All Nippon Airways, and United Airlines.

Boeing 777

Also known as the Triple Seven, the Boeing 777 is the largest long-ranged, wide-bodied, twinjet airliner in the world. It can seat over 300 passengers and, depending on the model, has a range of 5,235 up to 9,380 nautical miles. It bridges the gap between the size, range, and capacity of the Boeing 767 and the Boeing 747. It is a fly-by-wire airliner, which means that the controls are computer mediated. It shares design features with the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and is considered a more fuel-efficient alternative compared to other wide-bodied jets. The airlines that primarily use the Boeing 777 include Emirates, United Airlines, Singapore Airlines, and Air France.

Boeing 787

Launched in late 2012, the Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a mid-sized, wide-bodied, long-ranged twin-jet engine airliner. It can seat up to 290 passengers depending on the variant. Designed as an answer to the rising cost of fuel, it is currently the most fuel-efficient airliner manufactured by Boeing and consumes 20% less fuel than that of the similar-sized Boeing 767. It shares design features with the Boeing 777, which allows pilots to have the same type rating in order to operate both aircraft. By early 2013, several airlines have placed over 800 orders for Dreamliners. Those airlines include American, Bristish Airways, Delta, Qantas, and United Airlines. With over 800 orders received, Dreamliners will become more and more commonly used in the near future.






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